Author: Sarah L, historical, literature, long read, voices of resistance

The First Feminist Magazines: A History

Zine culture has been flourishing of late, quickly becoming a hotbed of modern radical thought, exploration of identity, and grassroots activism. Through the creation and distribution of independent zines, we really are quite literally seizing the means. This phenomenon is by no means new, however. The turn of the 20th century (the fin de siècle) saw the birth of some of the earliest women-driven periodicals and magazines, in response to fervent public debate around women, work and education – in 1888, essayist Mona Caird called “the subjection of women” one of the central “factors of our system” (sound familiar?).[1] They also emerged in part as a response to smear campaigns against emerging early feminist identities such as Bluestockings and the New Woman. This ‘New’ brand of womanhood had thoroughly unreasonable aspirations such as equality (gasp!), education (no!) and independence (quelle horreur!), and were largely viewed sneeringly by their contemporaries. The public image of the fin de siècle Bluestocking was the equivalent of the modern-day stereotype of the blue-haired-butch-hairy-lesbian feminist. She was cartooned and caricatured as ugly, over-sexed, unmarriageable, riding a bike – a symbol of mannishness, and independence.

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author: sarah q, bodies, Personal Essay

In Media Res: Notes from My Eating Disorder Relapse

TW: eating disorders, body image

[NB from Q: This was written about 2 months ago in the midst of an ED relapse – it was barely even written for the blog, but we’ve decided to share it anyway. I’ve since “recovered,” so let’s all agree to view this as a historical relic]

 

My perception of my own body has been distorted from a young age, a side effect from being brought up in a household that viewed bodies as inherently shameful. When I was 21 I finally found clothes that fit right after a bunch of friends took me shopping and convinced me that I wasn’t actually a size 14, and no, not all clothes are supposed to look baggy.

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