art, Author: Eileen E., bodies, boshemia magazine, Boshemia Staff, feminist art, interview, long read, photography, Q & A

Brazilian Women Tell Their Stories of Illegal Abortions in Camila Cavalcante’s “Nós Por Todas”

Camila Cavalcante is a UK-based Brazilian activist and photographer who has dedicated her career to documenting the lives of women who have been impacted by restrictive abortion laws. Camila’s recent project, Nós Por Todas, (Portuguese for Us For All), explores the idea of the female body as a confrontational space and challenges the stereotypical narrative of women who receive abortions. By photographing the bodies of women who have had illegal abortions and sharing their experiences, Nós Por Todas works to bring urgency to the debate around women’s reproductive rights in Brazil.

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bodies, LGBT+, poetry

This Is How Two Women Have Sex

By Emily Blair. This poem appears in Boshemia Magazine: Technology & the Sublime and in her collection We Are Birds by Dancing Girl Press. Photograph by David Cohen.

 

this is how two women have sex [i]

I wear galoshes.

She holds a thickly woven net

between her hands & asks

if I know how to play cats in the cradle. Continue reading

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Author: Sarah L, beauty, bodies, boshemia magazine, Boshemia Staff, Personal Essay

A Pilgrimage to Self Love

This piece originally appeared in Boshemia Magazine Issue 03: Bodies.

It has been a long pilgrimage to a place of self-love. I can see the summit, yet I have not fully and truly arrived.

I have learned to love the steep, wide slopes of my hips, and the soft rotundity of my tum—the droop of my breasts, nodding earthwards as though in reverence; my thick white marble thighs. Continue reading

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author: sarah q, bodies, Personal Essay

In Media Res: Notes from My Eating Disorder Relapse

TW: eating disorders, body image

[NB from Q: This was written about 2 months ago in the midst of an ED relapse – it was barely even written for the blog, but we’ve decided to share it anyway. I’ve since “recovered,” so let’s all agree to view this as a historical relic]

 

My perception of my own body has been distorted from a young age, a side effect from being brought up in a household that viewed bodies as inherently shameful. When I was 21 I finally found clothes that fit right after a bunch of friends took me shopping and convinced me that I wasn’t actually a size 14, and no, not all clothes are supposed to look baggy.

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