Author: Sarah L, literature

Badass Women in Literature You Never Knew Existed

This essay appears in Boshemia Magazine: Identity.

Unless you studied English Lit any further than GCSE level (that’s high school for you readers across the pond), there’s a fairly good chance that if I asked you to name as many women writers as you could your list would look something like this:

Jane Austen

the Brontë sisters

J K Rowling.

If you’re lucky, maybe even add Harper Lee or Virginia Woolf to that list. Continue reading

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Author: Sarah L, music, opinion, pop culture, review, Topical

Break Up With Ur Toxic Femininity Ariana, I’m Bored

Last week international sweetheart and overt blackfish Ariana Grande released her fifth album Thank U, Next, and with it her latest single ‘Break Up With Your Girlfriend, I’m Bored’. Taste in Grande’s music aside, can we please discuss what an absolute toxic mess of a song this is?? I was under the impression we were leaving petty girl-on-girl hate in pop music behind for 2019, but I guess Ari didn’t get the memo. You may think that seems ironic given we’re critiquing her right now, but let’s get one thing clear; we’re not hating on Ariana Grande because she’s a woman, or for no good reason. We’re critiquing her for being problematic.

Okay now that’s out of the way, let’s take a look at exactly what is wrong with this song.

 

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Author: Sarah L, satire

10 Flowers To Buy On Valentine’s Day Instead Of Red Roses

Did you know that each type of flower has its own symbolic meaning? Yep, as if the dating and romance scene wasn’t filled with enough landmines already, your choice of flowers may accidentally send distressingly wrong signals to your beloved. Yikes. With Valentine’s Day upon us, we’re sure you’d love to know how to avoid an embarrassing botanical faux-pas – don’t worry, we’ve got you.

remi-yuan-569402-unsplash.jpg

via Remi Yuan

Plant and flower symbolism dates back to ancients and folklore, and has pervaded throughout art, horticulture and literature. It’s pretty important stuff, so listen up, take note, and make sure you do this flower thing right.

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Author: Sarah L, historical, literature, long read, voices of resistance

The First Feminist Magazines: A History

Zine culture has been flourishing of late, quickly becoming a hotbed of modern radical thought, exploration of identity, and grassroots activism. Through the creation and distribution of independent zines, we really are quite literally seizing the means. This phenomenon is by no means new, however. The turn of the 20th century (the fin de siècle) saw the birth of some of the earliest women-driven periodicals and magazines, in response to fervent public debate around women, work and education – in 1888, essayist Mona Caird called “the subjection of women” one of the central “factors of our system” (sound familiar?).[1] They also emerged in part as a response to smear campaigns against emerging early feminist identities such as Bluestockings and the New Woman. This ‘New’ brand of womanhood had thoroughly unreasonable aspirations such as equality (gasp!), education (no!) and independence (quelle horreur!), and were largely viewed sneeringly by their contemporaries. The public image of the fin de siècle Bluestocking was the equivalent of the modern-day stereotype of the blue-haired-butch-hairy-lesbian feminist. She was cartooned and caricatured as ugly, over-sexed, unmarriageable, riding a bike – a symbol of mannishness, and independence.

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Author: Sarah L, boshemia magazine, Personal Essay

Growing Up Poor

I grew up very poor.

Saying that feels like ‘coming out’ as poor. It’s a hard thing to admit, and an even harder thing to own. It’s only really been in the past couple of years that I have fully recognised and accepted my identity as ‘working class’, and being ‘from a poor family’. Every time I talk about growing up poor I feel horrendously guilty and ungrateful, as though I am insulting and criticising my parents by acknowledging it—but that’s part of the whole problem.

fam sepia

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Author: Sarah L, beauty, bodies, boshemia magazine, Boshemia Staff, Personal Essay

A Pilgrimage to Self Love

This piece originally appeared in Boshemia Magazine Issue 03: Bodies.

It has been a long pilgrimage to a place of self-love. I can see the summit, yet I have not fully and truly arrived.

I have learned to love the steep, wide slopes of my hips, and the soft rotundity of my tum—the droop of my breasts, nodding earthwards as though in reverence; my thick white marble thighs. Continue reading

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Author: Sarah L, opinion, pop culture, satire

In Defence of Emojis

This article originally appeared in Boshemia Magazine Issue 02: The Sublime, authored by L. Buy your copy at our online shop!

According to Oxford Dictionaries, an emoji is “a small digital image or icon used to express an idea or emotion in electronic communication”; the term ‘emoji’ is a loanword from Japanese, and comes from e (picture) + moji (letter, character).”

People seem to hate emojis. They sniff at them and look down on them as a marker of millennial disregard for all things sacred. They claim they are “ruining the English language”. Apparently, emojis are immature. Emojis signify laziness. Emojis are probably the reason we can’t afford to buy property (or was that avo toast? 👀). Continue reading

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